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Tagged with "Muammar Gaddafi"
Gaddafi was killed by French secret serviceman on orders of Nicolas Sarkozy, Report Tags: Libya News Muammar Gaddafi Politics Crime
A French secret serviceman acting on the express orders of Nicolas Sarkozy is suspected of murdering Colonel Gaddafi, it was sensationally claimed today. He is said to have infiltrated a violent mob mutilating the captured Libyan dictator last year and shot him in the head.

The motive, according to well-placed sources in the North African country, was to stop Gaddafi being interrogated about his highly suspicious links with Sarkozy, who was President of France at the time.

Other former western leaders, including ex British Prime Minister Tony Blair, were also extremely close to Gaddafi, visiting him regularly and helping to facilitate multi-million pounds business deals.
 
Sarkozy, who once welcomed Gaddafi as a 'brother leader' during a state visit to Paris, was said to have received millions from the Libyan despot to fund his election campaign in 2007. The conspiracy theory will be of huge concern to Britain which sent RAF jet to bomb Libya last year with the sole intention of 'saving civilian lives'.
 
A United Nations mandate which sanctioned the attack expressly stated that the western allies could not interfere in the internal politics of the country. Instead the almost daily bombing runs ended with Gaddafi's overthrow, while both French and British military 'advisors' were said to have assisted on the ground. Now Mahmoud Jibril, who served as interim Prime Minister following Gaddafi's overthrow, told Egyptian TV: 'It was a foreign agent who mixed with the revolutionary brigades to kill Gaddafi.
 
'
 
Diplomatic sources in Tripoli, the Libyan capital, meanwhile suggested to the Italian newspaper Corriere della Serra that a foreign assassin was likely to have been French. The paper writes: 'Since the beginning of NATO support for the revolution, strongly backed by the government of Nicolas Sarkozy, Gaddafi openly threatened to reveal details of his relationship with the former president of France, including the millions of dollars paid to finance his candidacy at the 2007 elections.'
 
One Tripoli source said: 'Sarkozy had every reason to try to silence the Colonel and as quickly as possible.'
 
The view is supported by information gathered by investigaters in Benghazi, Libya's second city and the place where the 'Arab Spring' revolution against Gaddafi started in early 2011. Rami El Obeidi, the former head of foreign relations for the Libyan transitional council, said he knew that Gaddafi had been tracked through his satellite telecommunications system as he talked to Bashar Al-Assad, the Syrian dictator.
 
 
Nato experts were able to trace the communicatiosn traffic between the two Arab leaders, and so pinpoint Gaddafi to the city of Sirte, where he was murdered on October 20 2011. Nato jets shot up Gaddafi's convoy, before rebels on the ground dragged Gaddafi from a drain where he was hiding and then subjected him to a violent attack which was videod.
 
In another sinister twist to the story, a 22-year-old who was among the group which attacked Gaddafi and who frequently brandished the gun said to have killed him, died in Paris last Monday.
 
Ben Omran Shaaban was said to have been beaten up himself by Gaddafi loyalists in July, before being shot twice.He was flown to France for treatment, but died of his injuries in hospital.
Sarkozy, who lost the presidential election in May, has continually denied receiving money from Gaddafi. 
 
Today he was unavailable for comment, but is facing a number of enquiries into alleged financial irregularities.
 
Source: dailymail
'Gaddafi's death as tragic as US envoy fate,' Mugabe To UN Assembly Tags: News Zimbabwe Politics Robert Mogube Muammar Gaddafi Breaking News
Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe said on Wednesday the death of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi was as tragic as that of U.S. Ambassador to Libya Christopher Stevens, as he delivered a scathing critique of U.S., U.N. and NATO actions.

Speaking firmly, if occasionally stumbling over words, the 88-year-old president accused the United States of "rushing to suck oil from Iraq" when it invaded the country in 2003 on the erroneous grounds that it possessed weapons of mass destruction.

He said the U.N. Security Council had allowed itself to be "abused" last year by authorizing "all necessary measures" - diplomatic code for military intervention - to protect civilians in Libya in a NATO operation that eventually toppled Gaddafi's government and led to his death at the hands of rebels.
 
Speaking with deliberate irony, Mugabe opened an address to the U.N. General Assembly by praising as "most glowing and most moving" a speech by U.S. President Barack Obama on Tuesday in which he rued Stevens' death.
 
Stevens and three other Americans were killed during what Washington has called a "terrorist" attack on the U.S. mission in Benghazi on September 11. The assault forced the evacuation of U.S. personnel from the eastern city that was the hub for the Libyan rebel movement.
 
"I am sure we were all moved, we all agree, that it was a tragic death indeed and we condemn it," said Mugabe, who has ruled Zimbabwe since independence from Britain in 1980 and is among Africa's longest-serving leaders.
 
"As we in spirit join the United States in condemning that death, shall the United States also join us in condemning that barbaric death of the head of state of Libya - Gaddafi? It was a loss, a great loss, to Africa, a tragic loss to Africa."
 
'A HUNT, A BRUTAL HUNT'
 
The Zimbabwean accused the United States and North Atlantic Treaty Organization, the 28-member Western security alliance whose air strikes helped Libyan rebels defeat Gaddafi's forces, of acting under false pretenses.
 
"The mission was strictly to protect civilians, but it turned out that there was a hunt, a brutal hunt, of Gaddafi and his family," Mugabe said. "In a very dishonest manner we saw ... Chapter 7 being used now as a weapon to rout a whole family."
 
Chapter 7 of the United Nations Charter allows the U.N. Security Council to authorize actions ranging from diplomatic and economic sanctions to military intervention.
 
"Bombs were ... thrown about in a callous manner and quite a good many civilians died. Was that the protection that they had sought under Chapter 7 of the Charter?
 
"So the death of Gaddafi must be seen in the same tragic manner as the death of Chris Stevens. We condemn both of them."
 
Mugabe, a long-standing critic of the West, is himself widely criticized for turning what was once one of Africa's strongest economies into a basket case and has been accused of hanging on to power through vote-rigging.
 
Other speakers at the U.N. General Assembly on Wednesday - notably Bolivia's leftist president, Evo Morales, and Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad - also criticized the United States for what they see as economic and political bullying.
 
A U.S. official had no immediate comment on Mugabe's remarks.
 
The Zimbabwean leader appeared to be in reasonable health despite questions about his wellbeing sparked by Zimbabwean media reports that he has traveled to Singapore eight times in the past year to seek medical attention.
 
He walked in an almost jaunty manner to and from the lectern in the General Assembly hall, where he read his speech from a written text.
 
Source: Reuters
Man who helped capture Libya’s Muammar Gaddafi dies Tags: Libya News Muammar Gaddafi Omran Sha’aban
The man who helped capture Libya’s slain dictator Muammar Gaddafi has died of injuries sustained due to torture by a group of Gaddafi loyalists who had kidnapped him.

Omran Sha’aban died on Tuesday, about a year after being credited with discovering Gaddafi hiding in a drainage pipeline. 

In July, the 22-year-old and three others were kidnapped by the Gaddafi loyalists in the northwestern town of Bani Walid, which was a stronghold of the former Libyan regime. 
 
He was shot in the neck and stomach at the time he was kidnapped by the group, and he is believed to have been severely tortured by the kidnappers. 
 
Sha’aban was freed several weeks ago and taken to the French capital Paris for medical treatment, where he died of injuries. His body was transferred to his hometown city of Misrata.
 
The ruling General National Congress (GNC) has ordered the Libyan army and police to find the kidnappers and “use force if necessary.” 
 
The GNC also published a statement on Tuesday, praising Sha’aban as a “brave hero,” although he was never rewarded over the Gaddafi case. 
 
Source: Presstv
Libyan families move into remains of Gaddafi fortress Tags: Muammar Gaddafi Libya News Politics Northern African News
It used to be the impenetrable fortress of Muammar Gaddafi's regime. Only workers or members of the toppled Libyan leader's inner circle could see inside.

Now, six months after Tripoli fell to Western-backed rebels, dozens of families have moved into the few buildings still standing in the charred remains of Gaddafi's Bab al-Aziziya compound, setting up homes amid the rubble.

Their move, largely for economic reasons they say, highlights the collision between two parts of Libyan society.
 
On one side are the pro-Gaddafi elite who benefited from his largesse, and on the other are ordinary people who, while not poor by regional standards, only saw a small share of Libya's huge energy wealth.
 
Rebels forced Gaddafi to abandon his Tripoli stronghold, a huge complex of houses, offices and storage buildings which was targeted by NATO warplanes several times during the war. They burned, looted and defaced what for years was a forbidding symbol of the autocratic leader's power.
 
Days after the walls of the Bab al-Aziziya compound came tumbling down in late August, school chemistry teacher Majid moved his wife and seven children into one of its villas believed to be once occupied by one of Gaddafi's officers.
 
"Before, when I would drive past Bab al-Aziziya, I wouldn't even dare to look at it, we were afraid to even talk in the car," the 50-year-old said as he walked around his new large four-bedroom house with its separate guest quarters.
 
"We never imagined we would even enter this place; now I am living here."
 
Majid said he found the house in disarray when he arrived and has since been working to restore it. He has repainted walls but a corridor is still charred. As a pot of stew steams on a cooker in the kitchen, his family sit next door watching television in a living room. Outside, a toilet lies in the grass, nearby, pieces of a broken wooden cupboard lie scattered.
 
"It is much better than where I lived before," he said.
 
MAKING A NEW HOME
 
Others are not as comfortable. Behind Majid's villa, 24-year-old Saja Mohammed al-Sahali and her husband Haithem live in a room that once passed for an office.
 
Teapots, plastic cups and plates on a tray and suitcases of clothes, lie scattered on a carpet. Plastic flowers and plants stand in vases around the room.
 
"There is nowhere else for us to stay. We can't keep on paying rent, that's why we came here. We don't have anybody," al-Sahali said, fighting back tears.
 
"To be honest, it's not healthy, there is no power, no water, it's cold. There is nothing. But what can we do?"
 
While the residents may not have deeds to their property, Haithem presents a document signed by a nearby neighborhood military council that gives them permission to stay. It does not mention Bab al-Aziziya specifically, but cites Haithem's needs for accommodation.
 
The families have inhabited the last standing buildings of the sprawling complex. In front of them, piles of rubble have yet to be moved. Children ride bikes and run around fallen basketball hoops and empty ammunition boxes.
 
The black, green and red flags of the now ruling National Transitional Council (NTC) dot the landscape.
 
"THE HOUSE OF RESISTANCE"
 
After the eight-month war that ended with Gaddafi's capture and killing in October, nowhere is the Libyan rebels' victory more apparent than in the complex from where the former strongman used to taunt his foes.
 
The names of the rebel brigades who captured the compound are now commemorated in graffiti sprayed all over the walls.
 
A statue of a golden fist crushing a fighter jet, a memorial Gaddafi erected outside a building that was bombed by the United States in 1986 and he dubbed "the House of Resistance," has been moved to the coastal town of Misrata.
 
The families that have set up home are not the only ones who have taken up the premises. On Fridays, vendors set up stalls selling everything from food, clothes to electronic goods.
 
The NTC, which is struggling to impose its authority on a country awash with weapons, has yet to announce concrete plans for Bab al-Aziziyah but there has been talk of turning the complex into a park.
 
Zaki Salem, a spokesman for the families, said they had sent letters to local authorities saying they had moved in and hoped the government would re-house them if it redeveloped the site.
 
Like Majid, Salem said that he was afraid to stop his car anywhere near Bab al-Azizya before.
 
"How do you think I feel that I am now here inside in his castle? I truly feel that I am a Libyan citizen," he said.
 
"I have dignity, I have freedom. There is nothing, no restrictions, it is our land and we can live anywhere."
 
Source: Reuters
Pro-Gaddafis gain control of Bani Walid, 5 NTC troops killed Tags: Muammar Gaddafi Libya News Music News Northern Africa News African Wars politics
Following a deadly attack against a base in Bani Walid, loyalists of slain Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi have reportedly gained control over his one-time bastion.
 
"The loyalists of Gaddafi took control of the entire city of Bani Walid," former National Transitional Council (NTC) member M'barek al-Fotmani said on Monday. 
 
The latest developments follow an attack by loyalists against a base, killing at least five “thuwar” (anti-Gaddafi revolutionaries) and injuring tens more. A commander is reportedly among the dead. 
 
According to Fotmani, the loyalists were carrying green flags and chanting pro-Gaddafi slogans. 
 
Bani Walid, 170 kilometers (110 miles) south of Tripoli, was one of the last pro-Gaddafi bastions to fall in the deadly uprising against the former dictator's rule. 
 
Meanwhile, the US has sent some 12,000 troops to Libya. The deployment is said to be aimed at generating stability and security in the region, the troops are expected to take control of the country's key oil fields and strategic ports. 
 
The security situation in the country remains fragile months after the overthrow of Gaddafi. Militias have largely refused to heed calls to disarm. 
 
In Libya, protesters have been holding regular demonstrations for weeks, demanding the ouster of Gaddafi-era officials and more transparency about how the NTC is spending Libyan assets. 
 
Source: Press TV | LibyaNews
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